UK Science After Brexit

Sophia Akiva On the 23rd June 2016, the public voted for Brexit: Britain’s exit from the European Union, an event which will inevitably affect the careers of scientists both in the UK and the European Union. It is difficult to predict what the long-term outcome of Brexit will be and many of the arguments supporting … Continue reading UK Science After Brexit

On Good and Evil

Rowan Jaines The concept of evil is often understood to be the polar opposite of being morally good. Marcus Singer referred to the term “evil” as the worst possible term of criticism imaginable. He argued that evil is a human phenomenon since evil deeds must flow from the will to do something evil. In other … Continue reading On Good and Evil

The Butterfly Molecule

Jonathan James If you cast your mind back to chemistry class at school, you’ll probably remember learning about various types of atomic bonds. Typically, we think about the way atoms bind to one another in a couple of ways – ionic bonding, where oppositely charged ions are held together by electrostatic interactions, and covalent bonding, … Continue reading The Butterfly Molecule

Hunting to Extinction

Katy Drake Our planet is flirting dangerously with the sixth mass extinction of plants and animals. Humans the culprits; habitat destruction and direct exploitation of species the crimes. As the decline of terrestrial land mammals continues to accelerate, bushmeat hunting, in particular, has gained new attention. An international study, led by Professor William Ripple of … Continue reading Hunting to Extinction

Metallic Hydrogen: 80 years in the making

  Ashley Carley Rocket fuel, lightning-fast supercomputers and levitating trains are just three uses of the newly discovered metallic hydrogen – if, the Harvard scientists say, everything goes to plan. Hydrogen is the lightest and most abundant of all the elements. It forms two thirds of every drop of water, and almost 75% of the … Continue reading Metallic Hydrogen: 80 years in the making