Controversial Science Studies

Richard Kaskiewicz The history of science is littered with a myriad of debate and controversial studies undertaken to exact scientific progress. Take the theory of evolution, or the heliocentric model of the solar system, as two well-known examples. These theories challenged the societal norm and had stark implications on the nature of humanity. In more … Continue reading Controversial Science Studies

UK Science After Brexit

Sophia Akiva On the 23rd June 2016, the public voted for Brexit: Britain’s exit from the European Union, an event which will inevitably affect the careers of scientists both in the UK and the European Union. It is difficult to predict what the long-term outcome of Brexit will be and many of the arguments supporting … Continue reading UK Science After Brexit

On Good and Evil

Rowan Jaines The concept of evil is often understood to be the polar opposite of being morally good. Marcus Singer referred to the term “evil” as the worst possible term of criticism imaginable. He argued that evil is a human phenomenon since evil deeds must flow from the will to do something evil. In other … Continue reading On Good and Evil

The Butterfly Molecule

Jonathan James If you cast your mind back to chemistry class at school, you’ll probably remember learning about various types of atomic bonds. Typically, we think about the way atoms bind to one another in a couple of ways – ionic bonding, where oppositely charged ions are held together by electrostatic interactions, and covalent bonding, … Continue reading The Butterfly Molecule

Undergraduate Science Research Experience

Gregor Lawrence Science is a great thing to learn about; a desire to understand the world around us is engrained into everyone, so it’s no surprise that you’ll be reading this. You want to learn something new. But how do we come to know the things that we learn about in schools, universities, documentaries, science … Continue reading Undergraduate Science Research Experience