The Teenage Brain – Charlie Delilkan

We’ve all been there. “I’m leaving home and I’m never coming back!” “It’s not just a phase, Mum.” Slammed doors. Smashed plates. My Chemical Romance t-shirts and “bold” eyeliner. If you haven’t guessed already, I’m referring to those golden teenage years. Whilst we may have given our parents a hard time, we may not be completely responsible for that increased phone bill.

When we’re born, our brains aren’t fully formed so the first few years of our existence involve an expansion of connections – synapses – between cells. Approximately 10,000 different connections are made between the hundred billion brain cells you were born with by the time you are six-years-old!

But during our teenage years, these numerous connections are trimmed down; the brain decides which connections are important enough to keep, and which can be let go, depending on how frequently each neural link is used. This process is called synaptic pruning. This process actually continues well after we stop calling people “teenagers” – some researchers believe this only ceases in our mid twenties, sometimes later! But sometimes this process can go wrong, leading to important connections being lost which could lead to psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.

The synapses that are kept are then subjected to a process called myelination, where the synapse is given a sheath that helps them transmit signals more quickly. That is why the teenage years are so critical to your future development! Skills and habits laid down at this point are likely to stay in the long run.

Interestingly, the prefrontal cortex is the last part of the brain to fully mature (or finish pruning). However, this is the part that allows us to be an adult – it controls our emotions and helps us to empathise with others. Therefore, if your prefrontal cortex isn’t functioning fully, you tend to be impulsive and insensitive to other people’s feelings. Sound familiar? Don’t worry though – as teenagers mature, the prefrontal cortex is used a lot more when making decisions, showing that they start to consider others when making choices.

What about that stereotype that teenagers are “hormonal”? Well stereotypes usually come from some truth! Teenagers are hypersensitive to pleasure; rewards such as the neurotransmitter dopamine release is at its peak during adolescence. Any action that causes dopamine release is positively reinforced, but the actions that cause the most dopamine release are usually associated with a stereotypical teenager – reckless driving, drug taking, and/or risk taking. Or in my case, 7 hours of dungeons and dragons on a Friday night – please don’t judge. This reward system is also closely harmonious with the brain’s social network, which uses oxytocin, a neurotransmitter that strengthens bonding between mammals. This causes teenagers to strongly associate social interactions with happiness  and so constantly seek out social situations. This explains why we usually see a dynamic shift from kids being close to parents to teenagers having friends being their emotional centres.

So the next time the teenager in your life is threatening to throw a chair at you, just remember that parts of their brain are literally being destroyed. Cut them some slack, bro.

Are Puppy Dog Eyes A Real Thing? Emily Farrell

I went to a wedding this weekend and met a family friend’s dog. When she was happy, as well as wagging her tail, she pulled a face which showed her teeth. This was definitely not an aggressive face, it was far too derpy for that; they claimed that she was smiling.

She made this face when she was happy, but was it an innate action, not under her control, or was it only to tell us that she was enjoying being fussed? Facial expressions in non-human animals are hard to understand without anthropomorphising, but researchers have been working on how to better know what our pets are telling us.

They found that dogs make “puppy eyes” in order to communicate with their humans. It doesn’t matter whether or not the people are holding food, all that matters is that we are watching them and they will raise their eyebrows to make their eyes look bigger and sadder.

Wolves and dogs make some facial expressions such as snarling, which is used as a precursor to biting, whether they are in the company of humans or not. But it is currently unknown if this raised eyebrow look is used among each other or if this is just for us. If it is only used for our benefit, then it means that they have adapted to effectively communicate with us, something which may have occurred sometime after domestication around 14,000 years ago.

Humans are biologically destined to find things with big eyes cute, it makes them look younger and more vulnerable and means we want to look after them and smush their little faces. Dogs tap into this weakness for big eyes when they raise their eyebrows, making their eyes seem more expressive.

It is well established that dogs are more excitable when food is near, but the fact that they respond the same way to us with or without food, led researchers to suspect that these faces were not a purely innate, emotional response.

Dogs only do this as a way of connecting. They don’t actually feel sad, which is what a lot of owners think (much like how people think their dogs or cats look guilty when they’ve pooped in the shoe of an unsuspecting owner). It might instead just be a way to appease their owners and communicate that they have done this action as opposed to the emotional reaction guilt. In the same way, puppy dog eyes don’t reflect actual sadness, they have just learnt to make this signal as it creates a desirable reaction in the closest available human.

This is a good way of communicating between the species and was previously thought to only occur in apes. Apes and other primates are well known for making faces to communicate with each other, but they have also been found to use a selection of these to convey information to humans.

Dogs are one of the only animals to respond to a human’s gaze and will follow a person’s gaze, implying they can understand what people are trying to communicate. Horses can also do this to an extent, which suggests that it is a by product of domestication and a willingness to understand.

So there you go. Your dog is probably trying to communicate with you, just don’t be fooled into thinking that they’re sad and give them your last chicken nugget.

Why do we Procrastinate?

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Emily Farrell

Everyone procrastinates. No one wants to write that essay, or clean the bathroom. If it’s not food, sex or sleep, your body is just not interested. Sure, in the long run you might need to write that essay, to get that degree, to get that job, to earn money to buy food to survive. But your body doesn’t understand, or care, about that. Your body is a thing made in simpler times. It is built for when survival entailed going off to pick some plants to eat, some reproducing and maybe a bit of sleep afterwards. But modern, western lifestyles are a horrible mismatch for this way of living. Imagine giving a caveman a long, boring, task to do such as moving numbers from one column to another (maybe with sticks, it could take a while to explain the concept of computers). Why should he do it? He gets no food from it. He gets no joy from it. Doing this task does not make him any more attractive to cavewomen who might then want to have his babies. It takes a reasonable amount of energy that is better spent in other labours. So why should he do it? To him, the answer is he shouldn’t. And this is the thought process your brain goes through when faced with a task. While the conscious parts of your brain know the real reason for the task, your ancient parts of the brain, which we share with our ancestors and other animals, do not.

Think about it. How do you procrastinate? Making a snack? (means you won’t starve to death) Taking a nap? (means you won’t be too tired to see the tiger of death headed your way) Talking to friends? (maintaining social bonds which one day might lead to you making tiny replicas of yourself vis someone else’s genitals) Watching cat videos? (evolution can’t explain the internet, but taking joy from something which takes away no resources you may have gained from the other tasks means your body agrees to it).

Cleaning your own room is therapeutic and has actually been shown to improve your mood while doing it and afterwards when you’re in your nice clean room. But when it comes to the gross shared bathroom every uni student has encountered, you put it off for longer. You procrastinate away from it. This is because you gain no real benefit from it. It’s not dirty enough to give you diseases (yet), and you don’t spend enough time in it for it to benefit your mental health. If you can’t see an immediate advantage, you won’t do it.

Procrastination is all about cost and benefit and finding the balance between the two. If the immediate payout does not equal or outweigh the energy expenditure required to perform the task, then the inclination to do it will disappear.

Think about this the next time you put something off and do something else instead. Would what you are putting off benefit a caveman? Would he benefit by doing what you are doing now? But don’t listen to your inner caveman. Listen to your inner modern human who wants that essay done, because they know that you really need to do it. Don’t let them in only at the last second to write it. Go and do something productive! Go!

Savant Syndrome

Ellie Marshall

Can you think of any talents you possess? Perhaps you’re a great runner or are skilled at
playing an instrument? Now imagine that you didn’t have to work for those talents at all, and that they are beyond all normal human capabilities. This is what it is like to have Savant syndrome.

Savant syndrome is a rare phenomenon where a person possesses unexplained and
remarkable talents despite mental or physical disabilities. Almost all congenital savants have some form of brain damage, usually to the left hemisphere and around 50% of savants have autism. The remaining 50% either have some form of damage to or disease of the central nervous system. Due to this, some people can acquire savant like abilities later in life after a head injury, dementia, concussion, epilepsy or other brain disturbances.

Exceptionally deep but narrow memory is common to all savants, which allows them to excel at certain activities. For example, one boy could recite the route and time table of every bus in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Such talents can be placed into 5 categories: music, usually performance and mostly piano, with perfect pitch but sometimes composing instead or playing multiple instruments (up to 22 in some cases); art, usually painting drawing or sculpting; lightning calculation, including the ability to calculate prime numbers; calendar calculation; and visual-spatial ability, including the capacity to precisely measure distances without the use of instruments, the ability to construct complex models with painstaking accuracy and map making. Skills are usually singular, although multiple skills can be possessed in some cases. The most common savants are ‘human calendars’ and have the ability to rapidly calculate the day of any given date or recall personal memories from that particular date.

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Image credit: Derek Amato

One of the most famous savants is the late Kim Peek, who inspired the character ‘Raymond Babbitt’ in the 1988 film ‘Rain man’. Kim was born with a developmental disability but memorised over 6000 books and had an encyclopaedic knowledge of history, sports, geography, music, literature and nine other areas of expertise. He could name all the US area codes and major city zip codes. He also memorised maps found in the front of telephone books and could tell you exactly how to get from one city to another and then how to travel around that city street by street. One of his most remarkable qualities was his ability to read books at lightning speed by simultaneously scanning one page with the left eye and the other with the right eye. MRI scans showed he lacked a corpus callosum (part of the brain that transfers information between hemispheres) with other central nervous system damage. Despite his brilliant mind, Kim had an IQ of 87, markedly lower than average and struggled to follow certain directions.

Contrastingly, Derek Amato was born without any brain dysfunction. However, aged 39 he suffered a head injury in a pool that caused him to suffer from headaches, memory loss and 35% hearing loss in one ear. Several weeks later something dramatic happened. Whilst round at a friend’s house, he spotted a cheap electric keyboard and without thinking he sat at it. He had never played the piano, nor had any previous inclination to, but his fingers found the keys by instinct and to his amazement rippled across them. He started with his right hand, playing arpeggios and climbing in lyrical chains of triads. His left hand followed, laying down bass and picking out harmonies. Amato sped up, slowed down, varied the volume and was soon playing chords as if he had been playing for years. When he finally stopped and looked up, his friend was in tears. Amato found he an overwhelming compulsion to play and would shut himself in for as long as two to three days exploring his new skill.

So, what is the mechanism behind this? There are many theories as to why this occurs, but the most widely accepted theory is as follows: When the left hemisphere and higher-level memory circuits of the brain become damaged, parts of the undamaged brain are recruited to compensate. Lower level memory capacities are also recruited. This is known as cross-modal neuroplasticity. It has been established that some savants operate by accessing low level, less processed information that exists in all human brains but is not usually available to conscious awareness. For example, instead of seeing a whole tree, they would see every individual leaf and branch. However, some argue that this ‘recruitment’ of new areas of the brain to replace damaged areas and develop new skills is a ‘release’ of pre-existing areas, previously masked by more dominant areas of the brain.

Savantism occurs in males more often than females in a ratio of 6:1, the reason being for
this that males are more likely to develop disorders involving damage to the left hemisphere such as autism, dyslexia and delayed speech. The left hemisphere develops slower than the right, meaning it has greater susceptibility to pre-natal influences. Testosterone has a neurotoxic effect and can slow the growth of the left hemisphere, allowing the right hemisphere to become bigger and more dominant in compensation. The right hemisphere of the brain is responsible for art awareness, creativity, imagination, intuition, insight, music awareness and holistic thought.

We cannot fully model brain function until we can account for and incorporate savant
syndrome. Understanding this condition has wide implications regarding buried potential in some, if not all of us. If such potential could lie dormant in Amato, who knows what spectacular abilities lie dormant in us?

Is Mindfulness Meditation worth it?

Emma Pallen

In the past, the word meditation was associated with Tibetan monks chanting on isolated
mountaintops. But nowadays, it seems that everyone and their cat are espousing the benefits of
the mindfulness-based practice. However, instead of aiming to achieve spiritual enlightenment,
modern meditation is far more concerned with the health benefits, both mental and physical.
With claims such as decreased anxiety and depression, boosted immune systems and even
being linked to a longer life span, it all sounds too good to be true. Is this all just pseudo-science
mumbo-jumbo, or have the Tibetan monks really been sitting on a panacea for human health
problems all this time?
Mindfulness meditation is the practice of focusing on the present moment, instead of
deliberating over past failures, or worrying about future problems. It makes sense that
something like this could improve mental health, especially in modern Western society, where
there are so many competing calls for our attention. Numerous studies have found that this
process of stopping and refocusing your attention on the present, whether that’s through
breathing, focusing on bodily sensations or simply by mindfully enjoying the food you’re eating,
leads to decreased rumination and worry. This in turn is linked to decreased anxiety and
depression.

Buddhist_monk_in_Khao_Luang-Sukhothai

Image credit: Wikimedia commons

As well as being beneficial for our mental wellbeing, mindfulness has been shown to have
numerous physical health benefits as well. Recently, researchers at Coventry University
investigated the effects of mind-body interventions on gene activity. Remarkably, they found that
for participants who practiced mind-body interventions such as mindfulness, gene activity was
reduced in genes related to inflammation. This is the opposite effect of chronic stress. Not only
does this reinforce the notion that mindfulness reduces stress, it also suggests that practicing
mind-body interventions may even reduce the risk of physical inflammation-related disorders
such as arthritis and asthma.
Practicing mindfulness meditation will not only lead you to a happier and healthier life, it may
also lead you toward a longer one. Researchers at the University of California showed that
participants who had attended a three-month meditation retreat had greater levels of an enzyme
that builds up telomeres than a control group. Telomeres are regions of DNA at the end of
chromosomes that get shorter every time a cell divides. The length of telomeres is related to
ageing and longevity, so it appears that mindfulness could be linked to a longer life span.
Clearly, meditation has its benefits. But, like many things that seem too good to be true, it may
also have a dark side. For some people, instead of leading to peace and enlightenment,
mindfulness meditation can lead to panic, depression or even psychosis. According to a study
conducted by David Shapiro at the University of California, 7% of people who have tried
mindfulness meditation reported anxiety, depression, pain, or panic. There is little published
research on these potential negative effects of mindfulness, perhaps because of its ‘trending’
status at the moment, publication bias towards studies with positive results, or simply because
those who experience these negative effects simply stop with practice and don’t report it.

 

However, there are some potential explanations as to why some people have such negative
experiences. Meditation involves sitting with and accepting your own thoughts and feelings,
positive or negative. This can be sometimes difficult for even mentally healthy people, so for
people who are already suffering with poor mental health or negative feelings, this could
potentially make things worse. Similarly, for patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD),
mindfulness can be difficult as traumatic memories can rise to the surface.
Nonetheless, the potential negative effects of mindfulness need not put us off. It may simply be
a case of weighing up the risks versus the rewards. Speaking to the Guardian in 2016, Floridan
Ruths, a mindfulness researcher and a practicing psychologist, compared the cost-benefit
calculations of meditation to how we think about exercise. “If we exercise, we live longer, we’re
slimmer, we’ve got less risk of dementia, we’re happier and less anxious,” he said. “People don’t
talk about the fact that when you exercise, you are at a natural risk of injuring yourself.” And as
with exercise, some people are unable to exercise due to a pre-existing condition, or may have
a higher risk of injury.
Another potential explanation as to why some people have negative experiences meditating is
due to poor practice, whether that’

Bangalore_Monument

Image credit: Wikimedia commons

s down to a lack of information on the correct ways to
meditate or due to a poor teacher. Indeed, unlike other forms of therapy such as cognitive
behavioral therapy (CBT), there is no professionally accredited training for mindfulness
teachers, and anyone can call themselves a mindfulness coach. This may have led to the
‘pseudo-science’ perception of mindfulness. Additionally, many studies that have found positive
effects of mindfulness only compared the effects of mindfulness to ‘treatment as usual’ (TAU),
such as seeing a GP, or to waiting list controls. This makes it unclear as to whether the positive
effects of mindfulness are simply due to placebo, spending more time with a therapist and
becoming more aware of emotions, or whether there is indeed an ‘active component’ of
mindfulness that specifically causes the observed benefits.
So, while it seems like mindfulness meditation does have positive effects, a lot more research
needs to be done. It is still unclear as to how long lasting the effects of mindfulness are, and
clearly, not everyone will benefit. It is also unclear as to the mechanism of action of mindfulness
and how it works in comparison to other forms of therapy such as CBT or talking therapy.
Obviously, what mindfulness does have is that is quick and cheap, and can be done by anyone
at any time. Also, unlike other forms of therapy that require a diagnosis before being able to be
accessed on the NHS, mindfulness can also be done to ‘maintain’ mental health, hopefully
avoiding the necessity of using other mental health services.

Will we ever ‘cure’ Mental Illness?

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Jonathan Cooke

People do not wake up one day realising that they have a mental illness; that their view of the world is clouded by a poorly defined alteration of their brain chemistry. It can take days, months or even years before a person comes to terms with that what they are experiencing is not ‘normal’. Even at that time, they may not immediately seek medical advice, to some seeking such advice is an admission of weakness; an inability to deal with what everyone else is dealing with.

That is not to say that people cannot recover from mental illness. The flood in the pharmaceutical industry of different pills and tablets that are prescribed to people to help their conditions would lend credibility to the theory that these conditions can be coped with. However medication doesn’t work for some, and for others it can make the situation even worse than before. Pills are not a one-stop solution, they do not suddenly fix your brain chemistry overnight. Even SSRIs (selective serotonin uptake inhibitors) only help to limit the amount of serotonin your body absorbs, it doesn’t alter the amount your body produces.

The negative reactions to these tablets betrays a much more important point: the debate over the cause of mental illness is still hotly debated. There is undeniably a natural-genetic component to their disorder. However does this make the development of mental illness inevitable? Or does it merely increase the chance of mental illness arising in a person and its environment that provides the trigger?

In addition, there are other ‘cures’ that over the years have been used to try and treat ‘mental illness’ over the years. It was not that long ago that electro-convulsive therapy (ECT) was prescribed as the most efficient therapy when trying to treat anything that was considered a mental illness. Whilst its efficiency at treating some conditions has been noted in the literature, very few therapies have generated such a heated debate, perhaps due to how the treatment is perceived. After all, no-one is likely to warmly receive the idea of having an electric current shot through their brain.

The evolving definition of what and what isn’t a mental illness should give pause to the idea of a cure. It wasn’t until 1987 that homosexuality was removed from textbooks which listed psychiatric disorders and being transgender is soon to be removed as well, replaced with the more accurate but no less weighted term ‘gender dysphoria’. Societies needing a cure for conditions which it doesn’t understand is perhaps its greatest failing. If we don’t understand or accept something, it is that something which is regarded as being in the wrong and having to change rather than our attitude towards it. It is therefore the reaction that these marginalized minorities receive that is probably the root cause of their higher than average rates of depression and suicide, rather than who they are themselves.

What use is a cure if it does not cure the stigma that comes with a mental illness. A book by Nunally J (1981) looked at the semantics that people typically associate with people that have a mental illness. Respondents, when describing a mentally ill man, were most likely to use semantics like “dangerous, dirty, unpredictable and worthless”.

That may have been several decades ago and times have changed; there are more public advocates of mental health awareness and the advent of the internet has allowed people to find others experiencing similar symptoms, helping them to forge support networks. However, to those unaware of those advocates or support networks, what are they greeted with? Most shows on ‘mainstream’ media that try to portray mental illness inevitably demonize characters on TV shows with mental health illnesses as either violent or unlikeable.

Full disclosure, I have not watched either 13 Reasons Why or To the bone, arguably the two biggest attempts to portray characters with mental illnesses recently. However, both were widely criticized, by the depression and anorexic communities respectively, for their inadequate portrayal of the issues that they raised. It would be naïve to suggest that a people are not heavily influenced by what they watch on television. In a paper in 1978, it was shown that people who watch a lot of crime-related television and police dramas are more likely to vastly overestimate their chances of being a victim of crime, as well as overestimate how many police officers and judges there are. (Gerloner et al. 1978)

These criticisms are not based on wild speculation either; Granello & Pauley (2000) demonstrated that portrayals of mentally ill characters on TV and film are typically made out to be “violent and unpredictable”. This is not just negative for those who wish to identify with a character on TV that represents them, but also for the general public. With the ever emerging evidence that genetics play a part in the development of mental illness, such demonization of the mentally ill allow the rest of the public to separate the mentally ill into a ‘other’ group of people, different and unique to them.

This separation of the population into ‘normal’ and ‘other’ leads to a disassociation and an inability to understand that mental illness is a sliding scale of grey with no two conditions exactly alike. My depression and anxiety do affect me, but they affect others differently to me. There are similarities, but also differences. It is this nuance that is missing in our discourse when we discuss mental illness in the media and with the public.

Some people get better without a recognized ‘cure’. They open up, discuss their problems and find they are not quite as alone as they thought they were. There is power in the ability to talk with your fellows about how you are feeling. But how can they hope to ever feel they are better if society refuses to acknowledge that someone can recover from mental illness without the need for a specially crafted ‘happy pill’ that solves all their problems? Curing mental illness is a lofty and admirable goal; but my training is not in that area and so it would be unwarranted of me to posit that such a cure is achievable.

Cures begin by having an accurate picture of what we are trying to cure. We could not cure the plague by ‘bleeding’ the badness away. To help those with mental illness, we have to understand that many of the common mental illnesses, depression/anxiety, are exacerbated by the society in which we live. Therefore, should not the conversation be about curing society and not those that live within it?

Often Misunderstood: Schizophrenia

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Rhiannon Freya Lyon

Often misunderstood, schizophrenia is possibly the most stigmatised of mental illnesses. This is largely down to a lack of education on it in the general public, leading to misconceptions that it is some sort of split personality disorder, causing those with it to be violent towards others. The word may conjure up images of padded cells, straight-jackets, and someone who must be kept isolated from society for the good of everyone. The media definitely doesn’t do anything to help with this image.

In reality, this could not be further from the truth. Schizophrenia is complex, made up of many different types of symptoms, and definitely doesn’t cause a person to be any more violent than someone without schizophrenia would be.  Although there is currently no cure for schizophrenia, as unfortunately is the trend with mental illnesses, there are many medications and talking therapies that together can work to alleviate an individual’s symptoms, greatly increasing their quality of life.

Symptoms

When one thinks of the symptoms of schizophrenia, the first things that come to mind are things like auditory hallucinations (hearing voices) and delusions (e.g. paranoia). These are known as the ‘positive’ or ‘psychotic symptoms’ of schizophrenia (not positive as in good, but positive as in they are in addition to ‘normal’ experiences). Although auditory hallucinations are the most common, hallucinations of all the other senses can occur too, such as visual hallucinations, the sense of being touched when you are not, and even sensing smells and tastes that are not there. Delusions are beliefs that do not line up with reality, for example those suffering from delusions may feel that they are being followed or plotted against, or that they have committed a terrible crime. These delusions can cause them to feel overwhelmed and act in ways that may seem to not make sense to others. Another positive symptom is disorganised thinking, which may cause the person to talk more quickly or slowly, and jump from topic to topic in with no obvious link.

However positive symptoms are only a part of schizophrenia. There are also ‘negative symptoms’ which are more similar in character to depression, and usually involve a lack of something. They include things like loss of motivation and enjoyment of life, changing sleep patterns, withdrawal from social activities, and memory problems. Negative symptoms are much less dramatic than positive ones, but they generally last longer, and those with schizophrenia often say that they feel the negative symptoms have the biggest impact on their life.

Types

There are a number of forms of schizophrenia, distinguished by their different combinations of various types of positive and negative symptoms. Paranoid schizophrenia is the most common and well known type, often developing in a person’s 20s, and includes prominent hallucinations and delusions. Other types of schizophrenia may be more focused on negative symptoms (simple and residual schizophrenia), or on a specific type of hallucinations, such as experiencing unusual bodily sensations in canasthopathic schizophrenia.

Causes

It is not entirely clear what causes schizophrenia, although many risk factors have been identified. Schizophrenia is thought to have some genetic component, as demonstrated by twin studies, but this alone does not cause a person to have schizophrenia, which also requires environmental stressors such as losing a loved one or going through big life changes. Subtle differences in brain structure are also seen in some people with schizophrenia, but not all.

High levels of the neurotransmitter dopamine are associated with hallucinations and delusions. Drugs that lower the levels of dopamine are known to relive some of the positive schizophrenic symptoms – suggesting that those with schizophrenia either have too high levels of this neurotransmitter in the brain, or are somehow overly sensitive to it. Recreational drugs such as amphetamines and cannabis with a high THC content are also associated with the development of schizophrenia, it is unclear whether these directly trigger the disease or if people more likely to develop schizophrenia are also more likely to use these drugs.

There is also evidence that birth complications such as not getting enough oxygen during birth, being born prematurely, or having a low birth weight also increase the risk of developing schizophrenia later in life. This may be due to subtle changes in the brain caused by these complications.

Treatment

A combination of medication and talking therapies are usually used to combat the symptoms of schizophrenia. The main medications used are antipsychotics, which help alleviate the positive symptoms. There are two main classes of antipsychotics: typical and atypical. Typical antipsychotics used to be used to treat psychosis, but often gave Parkinson’s-like side effects (as Parkinson’s disease involves the death of dopamine-producing neurons), so have more recently been replaced with atypical antipsychotics. Antidepressants can also sometimes be used to help with the negative symptoms.

Cognitive behavioral therapy can be useful in allowing the individual to manage their symptoms more easily, recognising delusions and hallucinations for what they are and making them less overwhelming. Education about the illness and how to spot early signs of a psychotic episode are helpful for both the individual with the illness and those close to them, it’s very important for family and friends of someone with schizophrenia to understand the condition and how to help.